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Mike’s Before and After Pics Appear in News.com.au

27 Mar 2013, by admin in Beauty

AUSTRALIANS are getting cosmetic surgery and injectable muscle relaxants in order to give themselves an edge against younger co-workers.

People who are worried about being discriminated against at work because of their age are having facial procedures to appear more “fresh” and “energetic”.

But body image experts warn the practice is dangerous and it is creating an impression that good looks and youth are necessary to be seen as successful.

Linda Ayles, 43, first had injectable muscle relaxants when she was 32 to increase her confidence in her professional life.

“I was getting there really bad crows feet in my 30s and it was affecting my confidence at work,” Ms Ayles said.

“In a guy they say ‘that adds character’, same with grey hair, but on a female in her 30s you just look tired.

“People start thinking ‘Is she capable of being in high pressure roles?’”

Ms Ayles has worked in sales and marketing for more than 20 years in “male-dominated” industries like manufacturing, aerospace and fast-moving consumer goods.

“Looks are important – it’s an old boys’ club. You do get treated differently.”

In addition to getting injectable muscle relaxants since her 30s, Ms Ayles most recently had a facial slimming procedure, including injections into her masseters (chewing muscles) and dermal fillers in her cheeks.

“I recommend it to my friends, I’m not ashamed or embarrassed. I see it as an advantage,” she said.

“I have gone for promotions and other roles that I might have not actually looked at if I didn’t feel so confident.”

Ms Ayles said she thinks women start being overlooked in favour of younger staff as early as when they are in their thirties.

“I was looking at my mid-thirties thinking ‘Do I want to be considered as young and fresh and vital?’” she said.

“It is linked to succession planning in organisations – when people look as though they’ve got energy, drive and passion they’re considered in the company’s plans.”

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